Binaural beat music?

Anyone familiar with Binaural Beats music? Not sure if it would be a good idea or not to use. Has anyone tried it?

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I’m not quite sure that I’d call it music, but I’ve had good experiences with some of the Sacred Acoustics stuff.

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Yes! I have a couple on YouTube that I have been using and I really like it. Before I was using a personal, upbeat playlist.

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I use a binaural beats meditation for anxiety and stress reduction (Insight Timer app). I’m curious what tracks/apps others have found useful.

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Sometimes it sounds like noise
Sober; but when you are on ketamine, it really influences is the experience.

A couple of my best disassociated infusions came while listening to Marconi Union - weightless and another was 432hz Deep healing music for the body and soul. Dueter’s music works well too. You just have to listen and find what works for you. I find the slower smooth and constant meditation sounds works best for me.

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Is this on Spotify? So many with that name! Which one do you prefer?

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I use Musi for my music. Not necessarily a preference but just what I found and kept using it. It actually downloads off YouTube a lot. The 432hz that I use has this purple neon lotus looking flower with a pink middle. Also has DNA repair in the title and the music is 6hrs long. Hope you can find it. It works for me.

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Just be careful. I tried it once & I will NEVER do it again. Really bad trip and scary.

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There is an artist, available on Spotify, and actually on Youtube called “Lune Innate” also just under “Innate”
I credit her binaural beats, affirmations, 1hr long meditation/spiritual quest tracks to be one of the most healing parts of my infusion experience. I was had a lot of trauma; and have been doing the work, EMDR, DBT, CBT, etc for over four years and these types of tracks really lifted my infusions to a higher plane of healing I am certain. Lune Innate on Spotify, “One hour Chakra Balancing Affirmations” as well as “love and abundance affirmations” are two of my favorite. I recommend it full-heartedly. But trust your music; another artist on YouTube had really creepy subliminal messaging in the tracks which was NOT helpful. Blessings.

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Yes! My therapist did brainspotting with me and I downloaded David Grand’s Bilateral Stimulation music playlist on Apple Music to use for the Ketamine treatment. I’m undecided yet on how effective it was - I just had my third treatment and listened to regular music and it was great! But I wonder how helpful it is? It felt like being fabulously high at a nightclub!

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I like Hemi-Sync’s Journey Into Your Heart - it’s about an hour long so gets me through most of my appointment. I follow it with their Illuminating Your True Nature and Soul Infusion. https://hemi-sync.com

I also really like Liquid Mind’s albums. They aren’t binaural/don’t have the Hemi-Sync technology but I like them for setting intentions and integration.

I did do a couple of treatments with Liquid Mind but felt they weren’t quite as effective as the ones done with Hemi-Sync. I also did a treatment using a couple of Hemi-Sync’s shamanistic selections but found I didn’t like the percussion - it was too insistent for me. No doubt treatment music preferences are as individual as treatment!

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Responding to both of you: As long as you enjoy the music, I don’t think it matters. The important thing is to have a good music that enhances the experience. The Electric Light Orchestra sounds amazing on ketamine. I love my own music on ketamine. Evanescence is a very enjoyable listen! Don’t listen to live Led Zeppelin. They were on drugs and it is weird to listen to music that was made on drugs when you are on ketamine. I love Led Zeppelin. I just don’t recommend their live music for a good ketamine experience. Rush… it’s also very enjoyable! I also enjoy Bob Proctor‘s meditations. I am a drummer and I teach the instrument. Honestly some of the percussion or electronic drumming in the binaural music sucks. It’s really annoying and I don’t like it. Good drumming blows your mind! Bad drumming is a distraction from the ketamine experience.

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Ha! That must be what I didn’t like… bad/soulless drumming! Normally I love drums. My fave live band in college was Concussion Ensemble.

I can totally comprehend listening to Rush or ELO during infusion. I really wish there was a way to “practice” ketamine infusion so you could get everything dialed in before starting the treatment process!

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I think it was AZSkylady that suggested it was in your best interests to avoid preprogramming your infusion experience with selected music, and the more I think about it, the more I think she’s right. I’m having a little difficulty determining what will not have that effect but will still guide the experience in a positive way. Curiouser, and curiouser yet…

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I can definitely see her point - my thought is that if I used music that was “familiar” to me - like favorite bands, I think my brain would focus on the lyrics, etc. I don’t think that would be as effective. The stuff I’m using is so… spacey… more the singing bowls/random synthesizer stuff. Even if I listen to it regularly I seem to barely recognize that I’ve heard it before. So hopefully I’m avoiding it being too “programmed”.

Which reminds me…it seems like no matter what actual “song” of this spacey binaural/new age music I listen to during infusion - during the deepest part of infusion I swear it is all exactly the same, even though the songs and the portion of the song is not consistent. So I have to wonder if my brain just stops listening to the specifics and makes up its own sounds???

Along similar lines - read an article a while back where they did a study of classical/orchestral music versus new age/ethnic music and their effect on the brain during meditation. By ethnic I mean singing bowls, those Australian indigenous instruments whose name escapes me, etc…basically music from cultures who do meditation and trance work, whose songs tend to be less structured (for lack of a better word). Apparently there was much more and varied brain activity with the new age/ethnic music than classical. Very interesting - if I can find the article I will post it up for the other nerdy people like me who like to read too much.

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I chose some music from YouTube without realizing that there was subliminal messages. I freaked out big time. The CRNA thought of it right away and changed the music. It was a bad experience. I’m so grateful to have a great clinic where they are on top of things.
Thanks to all who posted on this thread, lots of great ideas!

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I only have music that I really like on my iPod. It’s good to have something to work on. Sometimes I just let go. I think it’s good to change it up so you get a different experience!

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Rush is excellent because they are so precise! The Electric Light Orchestra is amazing because their drummer played with so much emotion! Those two men are my favorite drummers. Neil Peart. Bev Bevan.

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Yeah - Neil Peart was such an interesting man as well as amazing drummer. He’s definitely on my list of “people I wish I’d known.”

Okay, I’m no doubt overthinking this BUT - does tempo influence your experience in any way? I’ve only listened to slow tempo stuff. And the vague imagery I experience also shifts slowly. I’m apprehensive about speeding things up. Wish I’d experimented more during my 6 series!

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