Telling your kids about Ketamine? Ketamine for teens?

I have been going back and forth on this subject. It was very hard for me to relax at home on Troches at first because my sons room was right next to ours at the time. He walked in a few times and startled me. We have an older house without locks on the doors. I finally told him that I am doing medicine and he shouldn’t come in while I’m doing it. He is 15 almost 16, and I’m sure he wonders about what type of medicine but hasn’t asked me specifically. He showed me an article once about psilocybin and depression. I’m not sure if he showed it to me because that’s what he thinks I’m doing or for himself. I told him psychedelics are not something you want to take lightly and from my experience as a kid I didn’t like them. Of course I was not trying to use them and be introspective, and I always had a bad trip because all of the issues in my life came to the forefront. If you are not prepared for that it can be overwhelming. I couldn’t handle it when I was younger and sometimes it can be overwhelming now. I have a better perspective now and realize bottling up your emotions is not the way to go.

My son also deals with depression, ADHD, and high anxiety. I have struggled myself having him take the same pills that gave me horrible side effects. He seems to do okay on them, but he definitely doesn’t like to or want to take them. I feel guilty sometimes when I’m on Ketamine about the relief I get or freedom from my depression and anxiety. I know his brain is still developing and it’s not recommended for him to do it according to my doctors except for in extreme situations. Has anyone heard of 16 year olds getting treatment?

His mom has been out of his life for the most part since he was 6, with the exception of maybe a few visits a year and that’s only recently. I know he has a lot of repressed feelings about it. I’ve tried to talk to him and we’ve had him in talk therapy. I just feel Ketamine would push those feelings forward and make him address them. I know he’s probably too young, but I don’t want him to wait until he is 38 to start working on himself. It’s been about 4 years for me. It’s a constant struggle. I want him to get off to a good start in life. A better one than I had. My family doesn’t believe in mental illness. I’m not a doctor but I think my mom and dad both suffer from mental illness. I believe they think it’s a weakness and don’t want to admit it.

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I would talk to an anesthesiologist or ketamine doctor about the effects on a teenager. Surely it sounds like he could benefit from this medication. It’s a very good question. Like you said you don’t want him to wait until he is 38 years old. Perhaps if we could help people when they are younger, the depression as an adult would be less!

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I agree. It would at least help you manage better. I’ve developed bad coping mechanisms throughout the years that I feel wouldn’t have happened if something could have been done sooner. I remember telling my mom as young as 6 about my anxiety and the tight ball in my stomach. I’ve had stomach pains/tightness ever since I can remember. Ketamine is the only thing that melts it away even if it’s temporary.

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I remember being in fourth grade and in science we were watching open-heart surgery. This was after I was shot in the face and I had my first panic attack. I didn’t know what it was and that other people didn’t experience the same thing because I was nine years old. As a child I wanted to be normal. But being a gunshot victim you are not a typical person at nine years old at all. There never really has been anyone to talk to about it that could relate. However I am not a victim. I am responsible for me. I take great pride in working on my thinking. I work hard on maintaining a positive picture in my head. Ketamine really helps me to stay there. It’s really the only medication that seems to take away physical depression. Even at the end of the month when it is time for my next infusion I don’t suffer from the physical depression anymore. It is definitely helping with the mental aspect of Childhood PTSD. I am 52. They threw a lot of medication at me. At one point I was sure that they had screwed up my brain chemistry. It’s so nice to have something that makes you feel good. I am so grateful for this medicine.

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I’m glad it’s been able to help you! I can’t imagine what you’ve been through.

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Every family deals with tragedy or trama. Thank you Fpeot1! Big hugs. This medicine could help a lot of people; but it is extremely important that it is administered correctly. I am glad that we are all working at learning more and more from each other. Ideas become powerful things.

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Do you have kids? If so, did you tell them?

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I don’t have children. However being a gunshot victim I was really good at special Ed. I was a teacher’s assistant for 15 years. I love children. I want to protect them. Honesty is a good policy with kids because they can adapt. If you explain, your children will understand. Any loving child just wants their parents to be well. I feel the same way about my parents that I did when I was a little boy. I love them. Having an open and honest relationship with them has made my life better!

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My Mom actually told me about ketamine therapy.

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Family is everything right now! So important!

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SO HAPPY you have ur family Savethebeetle and so sorry for your childhood trauma. :cry:
I really HATE childhood trauma!!! It’s bad enough that we had to endure what we did, then we have to deal with the depression & anxiety on top of it. :rage:
And fpeot I’m praying for your son and hope he is able to be helped like all of us out here. :pray::pray: Big hugs to you guys…

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Thank you brother!

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Big hugs everyone!

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I told my 13 year old stepdaughter that I’m getting infusion treatments for depression but haven’t discussed the psychedelic aspects because I think it’d be tough for her to really understand/process that right now. She’s still at a stage where she’s simultaneously fascinated and disgusted by people who drink alcohol (her mom and I essentially don’t) and thinks getting drunk is a very big deal, so I don’t think she’s ready to hear about ego death. I’m trying to be reasonably open about my treatment for depression in hopes of making it easier for her to talk about whatever mental health issues she may experience in her life and to help frame depression as a medical problem that ordinary people have like diabetes or dandruff or cancer or whatever, not as a moral failing or an indication of weakness.

I don’t have enough information or medical/biology training to have any idea what’s safe or appropriate for teens; but I believe that ketamine is used as an anesthetic for children/teens, so presumably the chemical itself doesn’t (in appropriate dosages, etc) cause damage.

My psychedelic (I’m not crazy about that word, but … ?) experiences with ketamine have been benign to positive. I haven’t experienced anything that’s been traumatic or upsetting; but I’m aware that others’ experiences haven’t always been as nice. I’d want to be really careful about exposing a young person to that, or making sure they had appropriate support if things did go in an unpleasant direction.

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My daughter is 17 and knows about my treatment and it’s psychedelic aspects. But we r also part native so this kind of thing to us is not abnormal. She has no experience with psychedelics and I never did prior to ketamine, but the mediation training I’ve had in terms of my own spirituality made me very adapted to handle the experience. I don’t think it’s necessary to hide it from teens and my doctor treats teens also so that can definitely happen if they need it. But during the experience, privacy is definitely preferred.

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I think in situation with children it is always best to tell the truth. Without the truth you cannot teach.

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